2007/04/13

Don Imus, The Peter Jackson of Radio

CBS today announced its decision to cease broadcasting the Imus in the Morning radio program, effective immediately, on a permanent basis.
And with that, CBS drops one of the few bankable radio personalities they have left. But does anyone really believe that Imus was dropped because of his "nappy-haried whores" insult of the Rutgers women's basketball team? I mean...come on! Imus is an subhuman asshole, and he's been an asshole for years. No...

When Peter Jackson took home the Oscar for LOTR The Return of the King, we all knew it was for a body of work. Because, let's face it, LOTR The Two Towers was a better movie, more deserving of a Best Picture Oscar. The same is true of Dom Imus. He's finally been recognized for a body of work that stretches back decades.

Congratulations Don!

28 Comments:

Good riddance. Now if we could only get them to fire Limpballs, O'Reilly, Hannity, Savage, etc, etc.
However it happened, I'm sure glad it did. I only listened to him once and that was by accident. He reminded me of hanging out with the good ol' boys at some filthy gas station on a hot, humid night. They have nothing to say that is of any interest to me.
So go ahead and flame me. I don't for one minute believe Imus is a racist.

He made deeply stupid and insensitive remarks, but that is what he does for a living. I in no way condone what he said, however it don't come anywhere close to the likes of Limbaugh, Hannity or the other Reich Wing hate mongers on the air.

He also called Cheney a War Criminal, called for the firing of Wilkes and Nicholson and has also derided Der Fuehrer's policy of Iraq and the treatment of the wounded returning soldiers.

He's a shock jock, that's what he does for a living. Yes he makes dumb stupid comments, but he is not a racist.

Sorry if you think ill of me for standing up for him, but in the greater scheme of life what happened don't mean squat compared to whats going on with our country.

God Bless.
PS: My verification work is lphoe.
I'm a bit ambivalent on the Imus affair. I approve of the way it happened because it was true market place expression which led to his ouster. He lost advertisers, and no one can point to a right held by anyone to be funded by people who don't want to be associated with you.

But I didn't feel entirely comfortable with all the talk about 'where is the FCC' and 'public airwaves' and so on. I think that sort of thinking is dangerous.

Finally I find it ironic that some wigged out ugly old fart can think he is qualified to slam around "nappy headed ho's". Nappy headed?! Take a look in the mirror you mossytopped gargoyle! Ho's? Listen to you're radio show... and just think of how you got where you are before you start slamming around successful college students as something they probably don't even know the meaning of!
If Imus is a bad guy in the view of people here, what opinions do the same people have of 50-Cent and a long list of thug rappers who glorify criminal action, degradation, violence and misogyny?

Imus -- I am not a listener -- ran a show that included a range of guests speaking on many many topics. Interspersed with his higher-minded activities were some cracks that undoubtedly insulted some people while entertaining others.

Meanwhile, black rappers are the main feature of many many radio stations here in NY City. The stations clog the FCC-controlled airwaves with vile, misogynistic rap and hip-hop music that is wildly popular with young blacks and young whites.

The reach of radio stations airing these vile lyrics is thousands of times greater than Imus on WFAN. Rappers perform in auditoriums all over the NYC area. Meanwhile, iPods are filled with rap songs and rap CDs flood stores, though I think WalMart has set some limits on what it will carry.

Imus is insignificant. That's what makes him a choice target for the ineffectual people otherwise known as black leaders, who have exactly ZERO impact on the appeal and spread of rap in the black community.

But when the chance to nail some 66-year-old white guy no black kids have heard suddenly pops up, well, as a hypocritical black leader, you have to seize a phony success when you can. Especially because any real success against the pathologies that eat away, yet form, black culture, is non-existent.

But, hey, Sharpton and Jackson, the country's two biggest race hustlers, bagged an old white guy because he fires off insults and slurs from time to time.

There were something like 41 arrests for major crimes among NFL players last year. Something like 39 of the arrestees were black.

Sure. It's a racist plot. Blacks cheered OJ's acquittal. A vicious black double murderer is acquitted and an undeniably huge number of blacks were elated. What does this say?

I don't care about Imus. I haven't been a listener for 20 years. But I do care about the hypocrisy.

Black comedians like Chris Rock and David Chappelle, chew up whites in their routines. Sometimes I think they're funny sometimes, and sometimes insulting. Either way, it's okay with me if they keep doing what they do.

But woe to the white man who insults some heavily tattooed black women who play on a college basketball team. Woe to him who shoots his mouth off on a rinky-dink radio station ignored by sports-fans.

Meanwhile, vile rappers are heroes in black culture, rewarded with millions of dollars and an acceptance of their brutal, often drug-fueled, misogynistic lifestyles.

Just think about the song that won the OSCAR for best song in 2006.

"It's Hard Out Here For a Pimp"

The lyrics are on the internet. This rap tune was voted the very BEST song of 2006. An OSCAR for the boost it gave the movie "Hustle and Flow."

Imus loses his job for making a crack few people heard, but black "artists" win an OSCAR for writing and performing a truly vile song. Of course, its vileness was muted enough to win the award. By rap standards it's not even close to the edge of rap sensibilities.
Imus got fired by money and liberal guilt. His show garnered large eight figures of green for CBS and Westwood. Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson of Tawana Brawaly and Heimetown fame, seem to have a hold over corporate advertisers that pulled millions of ad dollars from CBS before Leslie Moonves announced that he was pulling Imus for social reasons.

The same CBS owns four "Urban" stations that play sexist, misogynistic rap.

CBS's local affilliate, Hot 107, had its regional manager quoted in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution today as saying that the station is okay because it bleeps "ho" in songs played. Like anyone listening doesn't know what the bleeped word is.

I've spent my life being the "liberal, commie, pinko" among my friends. I've not liked Imus the few times I've heard him. But, I'm very tired of Corporate America enabling hate, be it white or black, until it thinks net profit will be reduced.

Sorry Kvatch, had to vent.
N/S: I just can't go there with you. I find it hard to blame racism on the black rapper, athlete and politician... Blaming racism on a group that has been the victims of oppression for generations seems a bit callous to me. Next lets blame bicycle riders for traffic congestion. Then we can blame the Iraqi's for the war on terror. Oh right... thats already been done.


You don't like rap lyrics? You seem to know an awful lot about them. It's almost reminiscent of the Meese commission on porn back in the 80's spending hour after hour watching porn... to better understand what they were investigating I suppose. And thank goodness they were so concientious about doing their good work! Porn would be far more prevalent without them investigating it I'm sure.

I think of it this way. I'm proud to call myself a liberal. But man does it irk me when someone like Karl Rove or George Bush calls someone I like a liberal. It's because that word... the label I am so proud to own means entirely different things, depending on who is talking.
OK, ok serves me right for putting up this kink of cockeyed silliness, but really...it's Friday evening for chris' sake.

AnonP... I'm not sure whether or not Imus is truly a racist, but that isn't the issue. He's still an asshole, a foul-mouthed shock-jock who's real interest is in getting ratings. Maybe No_slappz is right. Maybe the Sharpton's of the world got the "old white guy," but the old white guy is still a dick.

No_slappz...give it a frickin' break. You wrote a bloody treatise in response to trifle of a post. Imus was stupid. He pissed off the powers that be, something that you'll give him a buy for but will slam any schmuck on a blog when they moan about how the powers that be treated them.

Sorry Kvatch, had to vent.

S'OK Dave, but really... Imus got fired for being a class A prick, and now he'll probably go on to Sirius and make as much or more for the advertisers there as he did for CBS.
I wrote that Imus got what he deserved, when the two week suspension was handed down. Then all hell broke loose, or as we know it better, the Politically Correct Chorus started up, and it stopped being about Imus, and became a public stoning.

Of all the things we see within ourselves that scare us so bad. We think by offering Imus as a sacrifice, the demons will go away.

Nope.
One bad thing about the deal is he did raise money for kids with cancer and such.
kvatch, you wrote:

"Imus was stupid."

There's universal agreement on that. He was stupid. Apparently, a very special form of stupid. Rarely are people run out of town for a brief act of stupidity.

You said:

"He pissed off the powers that be..."

This is the point at which things become interesting. Can you identify and define the "powers that be"?

I'll give you a hint. In this case those "powers" are Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson. Are you suggesting they control the speech of white America?

Mel Gibson may be an anti-Semitic moron, but no corporate or studio powers in Hollywood have attempted to deprive him of his chosen career. Perhaps some people will stop watching his movies because his attitudes toward Jews offends them. Meanwhile, no one called for a lynching of Gibson's career.

The Dixie Chicks had a rough period. Listeners of the Clear Channel radio network complained. However, no recording company terminated the Dixie Chicks contract. The Chicks sought to settle the furor. But their livelihood wasn't taken from them by a couple of the worst race hustlers in the country.

Bush said nothing about the crack made by the Chicks. No press conference to discuss the mis-use of various epithets. No reconciliation with the victim of the crack. To be fair, the Rutgers women are not fair game. They are not the Dixie Chicks, not Bush, not Imus.

You said:

"...something that you'll give him a buy for..."

As I said, I don't care about Imus per se. I care about the hypocrisy. Imus is rich enough to retire. But that's got nothing to do with the hypocrisy.

You wrote:

"...but will slam any schmuck on a blog when they moan about how the powers that be treated them."

We're back to that "powers that be" phrase. What does it mean?

Based on what you've written, those "powers" seem to be whimsical gods whose mischief we can only endure.
Slappy - the "powers that be" are the advertisers, who feared for their product's identification with the slimeball.

K? Thks? BYE!!

CBS did the right thing. Parson, no matter WHAT "good" this vile-mouthed cretin allegedly did, it does not excuse the potential HARM from his words.

Oh, words can't hurt - no, not of themselves, but for this ugly, vile little man to spout this kind of misogynist BULLSHIT about talented, intelligent, articulate and successful young women plays into the entire objectification of women thing that has been escalating recently.

How would you feel, Parson, if your daughter - or your wife - or your mother - were RAPED by some guy, because he'd gotten the idea from this Imus-THING that it was just ok to do that, because "She's just a ho"

How would that feel? Would you then be so quick to defend this vile little man?

Shut up, Slappz, I don't care what YOU think.

Don Imus deserves every last thing he got and more. If I hear he has been rehired by ANY radio station, I will immediately begin a campaign to alert the advertisers, and will boycott any company that sponsors him.

And I don't buy rap "music".

Shut up, Slappz. Nobody cares what you think.
As I said, I don't care about Imus per se. I care about the hypocrisy. Imus is rich enough to retire. But that's got nothing to do with the hypocrisy.

Oh please... What a load of absolute tripe. What you care about flogging your pet topic du jour: The evils of rap music and the culture that supports it. My little satirical comparison is just an excuse for you to, once again, ascend to your soapbox.

I suppose that next you're going to tell us that Spocko, "...bagged the white guy" (guys actually) as well for convincing advertisers to flee the shock jocks on Disney's KSFO (Bay Area). No? Well perhaps that's because your usual scree--on this very blog no less--is to advance the notion that everyone is responsible for the consequences of anything they say or write, as you did here.

Oh, but wait... I forgot that your rules don't apply when we're talking about white multi-millionaires who have a long history of trying to offend everyone and their mother.
One bad thing about the deal is he did raise money for kids with cancer and such.

Parson, I suspect that Imus will be doing that for a long time to come. His career isn't over. He'll be on satellite radio in no time doing what he's famous for.
Hah! I felt kind of bad for getting all argumentative on N/S, and then I wake up in the morning to find that my instinct was right!

Why no response to my points though I wonder?

Here's my suggestion. If someone doesn't like rap lyrics, they should try not to memorize them as much as N/S seems to. It would sort of be like me, thinking George Bush is the worst President ever, memorizing each State of the Union address he'd ever given. That doesn't make much sense as far as I'm concerned! I'm tempted to say the sooner I can forget the man the happier I'll be, but thats not true. I want him to be remembered as a horrible leader. But I'm still not gonna memorize his speeches...
I don't get the flap over a guy that looks like 30 miles of bad road.

Imus is an adolescent trapped in an old man's body. He's a jerk. Even JERKS sometimes do good things (although I can't say that about Limbaugh or O'Reilly, so never mind.)

Still, the bigger issue is this: will DaniLynne inherit Anna Nicole's money? Will Sanjaya Malakar win American Idol, and thus put Simon Cowell out of a job?

Or will Americans actually start trying to pay attention to real news?
bhfrik, you wrote:

N/S: I just can't go there with you. I find it hard to blame racism on the black rapper, athlete and politician..."

Well, there wasn't anything in my comments that blamed anti-black racism on blacks.

You wrote:

"Blaming racism on a group that has been the victims of oppression for generations seems a bit callous to me."

You might want to re-work your conclusion. For decades the US has funded programs aimed at helping blacks. Food programs, housing programs, education programs, job programs, medical programs. Programs from cradle to grave.

Okay. At least the programs were motivated by good intentions.

Blacks were 10% of the US population in 1860, at the start of the Civil War. Today, the US popuation is about 11% black.

Billions and billions of dollars have been spent on social programs aimed at helping blacks. How much success has resulted? Hard to say.

Meanwhile, other immigrant groups have come to the US where they started on a road of astonishing success. Let's see. Jews, for instance. Jews account for about 2% of the US population. This much smaller group has endured plenty of discrimination in the US and the world throughout history. Yet even though the Nazis tried to exterminate all Jews, they, as a group, recovered.

Asians have come to the US and achieved tremendous success. These days they are such good students that top colleges in the US have chosen to limit Asian enrollment to balance their student bodies. That's impressive.

In NY City there are several selective public high schools. They are by far the best public schools in NY City. Entry depends upon a kid's score on a single test. Every kid in NY City is eligible to take the test.

Stuyvesant High School is the best of the bunch.

The composition of the student body is published, along with lots of other data about the school and school system.

The student body of the school system in NY City is about 75% black and hispanic; about 15% white; and 10% everybody else.

But, the student body at Stuyvesant is 50% Asian, 40% white, and 10% everybody else. Many of the Asian students are relatively recent arrivals. They experience plenty of hardships. Yet the Asian kids are dominating the academic competition.

When my brother-in-law attended Stuyvesant in the early 1970s, the student body was 50% Jewish, 40% other whites, and 10% everybody else.

Blacks and hispanics simply don't do what's necessary to get into Stuyvesant. Why is that? Plenty of poor kids get in. Acceptance to the school is based on nothing but one test score. Admittedly, the test is like an SAT. It's not easy.

What accounts for the rarity of black and hispanic students at NY City's best public high school? Remember, Stuyvesant is a public school. No tuition payment stands in the way.

Clearly it's something in black culture.

You wrote:

"You don't like rap lyrics? You seem to know an awful lot about them."

Really? In fact, I know very little about rap lyrics. I know about "It's Hard Out Here For A Pimp", the OSCAR-winning song of 2006 because every news venue in the country carried stories about it. I did check the lyrics on the internet to be sure of what I heard when I watched the performance on the Academy Awards show.

Also, I have a teenaged son who listens to a little rap. Sometimes when we're in the car and he tunes the radio to a station playing a rap tune we discuss the lyrics we're hearing.

You wrote:

"It's almost reminiscent of the Meese commission on porn back in the 80's spending hour after hour watching porn... to better understand what they were investigating I suppose."

You can be sure I wouldn't subject myself to hours of bad music simply to build an argument. I don't care what anyone listens to. But I do care about the impact of culture on kids, on my kids most of all.

You sneered:

"And thank goodness they were so concientious about doing their good work! Porn would be far more prevalent without them investigating it I'm sure."

Is there something wrong with studying porn and the porn industry? Your flippancy suggests there's nothing about the porn industry that should worry people.
kvatch, you wrote:

"I suppose that next you're going to tell us that Spocko, "...bagged the white guy" (guys actually) as well for convincing advertisers to flee the shock jocks on Disney's KSFO (Bay Area)."

I have no idea what you're referring to. Never heard of Spocko.

You concluded:

"Oh, but wait... I forgot that your rules don't apply when we're talking about white multi-millionaires who have a long history of trying to offend everyone and their mother."

Maybe you should re-read what I wrote. Like I said, I haven't listened to Imus for 20 years and I don't care that he lost his job.

Meanwhile, it's fine with me if people get themselves worked into a frenzy because some 66-year-old white guy uttered a nasty crack about black women on a college basketball team. Like I've said, the future of any public figure, especially a "celebrity", is a tenuous thing. Fame and celebrity can disappear overnight.

Like I said, I find it hypocritical that Imus's occasional cracks got him booted from a small-time radio station, when big-time abuse is underway every day, all day at hundreds of radio stations all over the country.

If he's so bad he must be driven from the airwaves, then either the lyrics and sensibilities of rap and the rap world are acceptable, or there's some industrial-strength hypocrisy at work here.

Which do you think it is?
sewmouse, you wrote:

"Slappy - the "powers that be" are the advertisers, who feared for their product's identification with the slimeball."

Really? Which advertizers employ Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson?

After you skipped your meds you speculated:

"How would you feel, Parson, if your daughter - or your wife - or your mother - were RAPED by some guy, because he'd gotten the idea from this Imus-THING that it was just ok to do that, because "She's just a ho""

sewmouse, do you think OJ Simpson got his idea to murder his ex-wife and Ron Goldman from listening to an Imus broadcast? If it wasn't Imus, we'd better find the real inspiration before someone else hear's the same message and imitates OJ.
You know what N/S... You have convinced me. It is the blacks through out this nations history who have had it good, and the rest of us who have been oppressed. Nicely done, I'm converted.

Wait a minute. I must admit that even in the 15 seconds it took for me to type that sentiment, doubt has reared it's ugly head. Well you nearly convinced me that blacks were the oppressors.

Frankly your take on invesitgating porn is as ludicrous as your take on race relations. My point was not that porn was good or didn't present challenges to society. My point was that the Meese peeps watching hours of porn only resulted in those commission members getting hardons... not in any sort of meaningful proposals about the issue. I did in fact sneer my response to that issue, because the Meese commission was a rather tawdry joke! Sometimes a sneer is the best answer to a particular issue.

You know what... in the time it took me to type up the whole porn response, I have reconsidered yet again. I think you have real issues about black my friend. Your take on it being all their fault, on black culture being the reason they are in the situation they are in, that America has been trying to help them along all this time... I think you are the one demonstrating a wrong headed approach to the issue. Frankly it is people like you who are part of the reason we are still having this debate!
Really? In fact, I know very little about rap lyrics.

That's too bad considering you've set yourself up to be the arbiter of rap's value and more generally of black culture.

The plain fact is that for every rap artist putting out a negative message, there's another putting out a positive message. And why does the negative message make it to the top of the pop culture garbage heap, because it's targeted at the young, and being young means being shallow, self-centered, and self-indulgent.

Was the message any different when Madonna was singing about an easy life based on treating men like walking wallets? No it certainly was not.
kvatch, I wrote and you responded:

"Really? In fact, I know very little about rap lyrics...

...That's too bad considering you've set yourself up to be the arbiter of rap's value and more generally of black culture."

My statement is relative. I can recite lyrics from countless songs. But I haven't committed the lyrics of any rap tunes to memory, though I've heard plenty. I've also spent time with my older son examining some rap lyrics as we hear them on the car stereo. I'm not suggesting I haven't heard many rap lyrics.

You claimed:

"The plain fact is that for every rap artist putting out a negative message, there's another putting out a positive message."

Really? A 50-50 balance. I'd like to see the data.

You said:

"And why does the negative message make it to the top of the pop culture garbage heap?"

The usual reason -- big sales.

You said:

"...because it's targeted at the young, and being young means being shallow, self-centered, and self-indulgent."

Do you have evidence that these characteristics are restricted to the young?

You asked -- rhetorically:

"Was the message any different when Madonna was singing about an easy life based on treating men like walking wallets?"

Yes. The other end of the spectrum. First, I don't own any Madonna music, but I've heard many of her tunes and seen her music videos.

In her songs Madonna exploits and expresses her own sexuality, demonstrating her enjoyment of sex rather than providing sex as an accomodation to men on their terms only. She presents herself as a woman who expects men to reward her the way SHE wants to be rewarded. An assertive woman who's proud of what she's got and confident she knows how to use it. When it comes to women, hers is the opposite of a rap sensibility.
kvatch
Imus has met his fate. The question is why have sleeze balls like him been on the air waves for this long. Bigger question is where has Les Moonves of CBS been all this time - on another planet? After Howard Stern was fined by FCA, he should paid more attention t what his shock joks were saying on CBS.

The good thing that may come out of all this is that rap music may finally clean up its act.
When it comes to women, hers is the opposite of a rap sensibility.

Another sweeping generalization from our resident expert on the "rap sensibility".

"The opposite"? Hardly. While Madonna was glorifying greed and manipulation, TLC and Queen Latifa were rapping about responsibility, particularly sexual responsibility. Madonna sang about escapism. Salt & Peppa rapped about bettering oneself. If fact, powerful women in rap have been making Madonna and her ilk look like self-centered, sex obsessed floozies for over a decade. But maybe that's the whole point, huh?

As long as you ignore anything positive in rap, refuse to acknowledge anything positive coming out of black culture, it's easy to make a song like "It's Hard Out Here For a Pimp" emblamatic of the entire genre.
Ajaz... Thanks for stopping by. I think that with CBS--all the media giants for that matter--shock jocks are a commodity, interchangable, until they're a liability.

For CBS, this is just business. Moonves doesn't give a damn what an Imus or a Stern says on the air, as long as the advertisers don't pull out. The moment they do...
The Two Towers was my favorite of the three.
kvatch, you wrote:

"While Madonna was glorifying greed and manipulation..."

If you're referring to Material Girl, you should check the lyrics. Her words express good sense far more than greed or manipulation.

You went on:

"TLC and Queen Latifa were rapping about responsibility, particularly sexual responsibility."

Gee, I haven't seen any of their songs listed on Billboard for hmmm, how many years?

You wrote:

"Madonna sang about escapism."

We are discussing pop music, right?

You wrote:

"Salt & Peppa rapped about bettering oneself."

Didn't they fade away a long time ago? They were, by the way, single mothers BEFORE they gained music stardom. That aside, I remember them and their generally upbeat message. But they didn't last as far as I know, and now, they're simply old in music years.

You wrote:

"If fact, powerful women in rap have been making Madonna and her ilk look like self-centered, sex obsessed floozies for over a decade."

Who are these "powerful women in rap?" Foxy Brown? Meanwhile, leading female rappers all rap about sex. An essential point of female sexual "empowerment" (I don't care for this term) is its self-centeredness. That's a positive thing. But you seem to think otherwise, which would suggest that black female rappers view sex as something done selflessly, to accomodate someone else. Not for their own pleasure. You know what kind of woman does that.
No-Slappz wrote:

"Sewmouse"

Sewmouse Responds:

Slappy - you need to read my entire comment before you respond to me - you missed the part where it said "Shut up, Slappz, I don't care what YOU think."

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